Category: Common Core

Alabama Should Lead on Rejecting National Standards

 

http://blog.heritage.org/

 Alabama Should Lead on Rejecting National Standards

Alabama has the opportunity to reclaim its education decision-making authority. It took the first steps toward doing so last week, when the Senate Education Committee approved a measure that would withdraw the Yellowhammer State from the Common Core State Standards Initiative—a push to nationalize standards and assessments across the country.  Read more here….

 

Eagle Forum’s Letter to Legislators on Common Core

April 22, 2013

Dear Legislator:

Alabama students deserve, exceptional, not common, standards controlled by Alabamians to teach Alabama values.

The Attached Education Reporter articles give specific examples of “fatal flaws” in the Math and English standards and illustrate their political – inevitable in any national curriculum.

See entire letter here…Legislator letter 4-22-2013.

Call, email for EXCELLENCE, NOT COMMON, STANDARDS for all Alabama students

 

Call, email ASAP for EXCELLENT, NOT COMMON, STANDARDS for all Alabama students

The education establishment came out in full force at taxpayers’ expense to support Common Core last Wednesday at the House and Senate Joint Public Hearing on HB254 and SB190.  We grassroots Alabamians MUST contact our State Senators and Representatives NOW to counter this continuing assault on state autonomy over education.  A critical vote is scheduled in the Senate Education Committee  Wednesday, March 6, at 8:30 AM.
Please call and/or email your Senator and the Senators on the Senate Education Committee to vote for SB190.  Ask them to:
1) PROTECT EXCELLENCE in EDUCATION that is controlled by Alabamians and Alabama values.  To support state control over standards (which drive curriculum decisions), Common Core must be repealed. The standards are owned by private interests (the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers). These standards were incentivized by the federal government and will be measured and controlled going forward by assessments that are aligned with Common Core. We want excellent, not common standards, under Alabama, not national or federal governance. Alabama’s prior Math and English Language Arts Standards were more rigorous than the unproven common core regimen; they were improving student achievement; and they did reflect ALABAMA values! 2) PROTECT STUDENT PRIVACY in Alabama law. The Obama administration stripped privacy protections from the Federal Education Rights Privacy Act (FERPA) via regulations effective 1/3/2012. Personally identifiable data can now be shared with outside entities. EPIC (Electronic Privacy Information Center) is suing the federal government over this action. Expectations are that demands and abuses of data will dramatically increase.  In Alabama, data collected at local schools goes straight into the state longitudinal data base. The data is clearly personally identifiable even though each student is given a unique student identifier. Not all the Alabama data points can be readily identified, but the National Education Data Model recommends 400 data points on each child including health, family income, political persuasion, and philosophical factors. A 2009 study by the Fordham Center on Law and Public Policy on Children’s Educational Records and Privacy recommended state measures to protect its citizens.  SB190 is an urgent step to protect Alabamians.
SENATE EDUCATION COMMITTEE All phoe numbers begin with (334) 242 (The rest of the number will follow each member’s name.)

Dick Brewbaker (7895), Chairperson; Quinton Ross (7880), Vice Chairperson; Gerald Allen (7889),Slade Blackwell (7851), Vivian Figures (7871), Bill Holtzclaw (7854), Shadrack McGill (7858), TripPittman (7897), Hank Sanders(7860).

HOUSE EDUCATION POLICY All phone numbers begin with (334) 242 (The rest of the number will follow each member’s name.)

Chair; Mary Sue McClurkin (7682), Vice Chair; Phil Williams (7704), Ranking Minority Member;Marcel Black (7686) Elaine Beech (7702), Mac Buttram (7775) Ed Henry (7736), Thomas Jackson(7738), Joseph Mitchell (7735), Kerry Rich (7538), David Sessions (0947), Lesley Vance (7687), as well as House Speaker Mike Hubbard  [Concentrate on Vance, Beech, Buttram, Henry, Sessions, Williams]

When you are on the wrong road, the right thing to do is turn around fast.


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Attend Hearing to Stop Common Core

CALL; COME 2-27 PUBLIC HEARING & PRESS

CONFERENCE To Stop Common Core Tragedy in Alabama

SB190 (Sen. Brewbaker) and HB254 (Rep. Barton) to return local control of education

• repeal adoption of Common Core

• protect family privacy & prohibit state bodies from compiling/sharing non-acedemic, “personal” data

• prohibit the State Board of Education from ceding control over education to any entity outside AL

1.  Ask your Senator and Representative to:

“Please support SB190, Sen. Dick Brewbaker’s bill to repeal Common Core.”  “Please

 support HB254, Rep. Jim Barton’s bill to repeal Common Core.”

2.  Call House Speaker Hubbard (HB254) 334-242-7739 & Senate President Pro-tem Marsh

(SB190) 334-242-7877.

3.  Come to Montgomery to hear former Texas Commissioner of Education Robert

 Scott and others testify in support of these bills at two events on Wednesday, 2/27.

1:00 PM Press Conference (steps of Statehouse)

3:00 – 4:00 PM Hearing Star Wars Room 8th floor Statehouse

“These standards make every child a cog in a machine.  There is nothing exceptional about this great nation when you make everybody the same [“common”, ordinary], when you don’t expect greatness from everyone… Let’s see how high individual determination can take our children and not have the tragedy of Common Core.”  Commissioner Robert Scott

The states of Texas, Virginia, Alaska, Nebraska and Minnesota never succumbed to federal government incentives to adopt Common Core.  Legislators in at least 14 states are considering withdrawing from Common Core standards, an “Uncommonly Bad Idea” according to Jane Robbins who will also testify Wednesday.  She says, “Simply put, the Common Core is designed to replace local and parental control over education with centralized, top-down control.  The purpose is to train students for jobs, not educate them to be full, thoughtful citizens in our democratic republic.”

States lose control of what students are taught and how they are tested.  In Alabama, 19 senators have agreed to cosponsor the Brewbaker bill (SB190) to repeal adoption of these national standards.  They are privately owned and CC states agree to implementation of every CC standard, as has begun in Alabama.  Alabama Math and English Language Arts 2010 Courses of study indicate that Alabama added state specific content of only about 2.5% (ELA) and 14% (Math).  CC standards are unproven.  Assertions that they are more rigorous than Alabama’s prior standards are incorrect according to Fordham Foundation, which ranked Alabama ELA #11 in the nation and Math “too close to call” compared with CC prior to CC adoption.  Curriculum choices must be driven by these state adopted Common Core Standards.

Although CC currently incorporates social studies and science as informational text in English Language Arts, national standards in science and social studies are also being circulated.  Improvements were already being made in AL schools.  Excellence in education for Alabama students is inhibited, and indoctrination objectionable to parents is inevitable by continuing with Common Core.

For more information see Alabamians United for Excellence in Education at www.auee.org or alabamaeagle.org.

 

 

California abandons algebra requirement for eighth-graders

DAILY NEWS Los Angeles

By Sharon Noguchi   Posted: 02/02/2013

By falling in line with other states, California is abandoning its push for all eighth-graders to take algebra.

Last month, the State Board of Education unanimously shifted away from a 15-year policy of expecting eighth-graders to take Algebra I. The state will allow them to take either Algebra I or an alternate course that includes some algebra. New state standardized tests will focus on the alternate course — the same one adopted by most states under the Common Core curriculum being rolled out across the nation.

Read the full article at  http://www.dailynews.com/ci_22509069/california-abandons-algebra-requirement-eighth-graders?source=rss_emailed

Race to Top Winners Make Progress, Face Challenges, Ed. Dept. Reports

By Michele McNeil

At the midway point of the federal Race to the Top program, the list of accomplishments for the 11 winning states and the District of Columbia is getting longer, but the challenges are getting more formidable as the time frame gets shorter, according to a progress report issued by the U.S. Department of Education last week.

 

Read the full article from EDUCATION WEEK at the following link. http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2013/02/01/20rtt.h32.html?tkn=UPBFJryyyLllDW6Yks3YRM6hHkZPzgAPDGPU&cmp=clp-ecseclips

 

Rotten to the Core (Part 2): Readin’, Writin’ and Deconstructionism by Michelle Malkin

(This is the second part of an ongoing series on federal “Common Core” education standards and the corruption of academic excellence.)

The Washington, D.C., board of education earned widespread mockery this week when it proposed allowing high school students — in the nation’s own capital — to skip a basic U.S. government course to graduate. But this is fiddlesticks compared to what the federal government is doing to eliminate American children’s core knowledge base in English, language arts and history.  Read more at the link below…

Rotten to the Core (Part 2):  Readin’, Writin’ and Deconstructionism

by Michelle Malkin