Tag: Teacher Tenure Reform

Reforming Alabama: Recapping the 2011 Legislative Session

Focus Of 2011 Session Was Serious Reforms

Last Thursday marked the end of the first Republican-controlled legislative session in 136 years.  It was an extremely productive session with Republicans passing several badly needed reforms.  The first of these was Representative Greg Canfield’s Rolling Reserve Budget Act which also had the distinction of being the first bill Governor Bentley signed into law.  It will have a significant impact on the future budgets and prevent proration for years to come.  Also noteworthy were Senator Trip Pittman’s reform of the teacher tenure system, the elimination of the state’s Deferred Retirement Option Program (DROP), and Representative Jay Love’s legislation to increase retirement contributions by state employees.

Alabama made national news with the passage of Senator Scott Beason and Representative Micky Hammon’s immigration reform legislation.  According to Kris Kobach, one of the nation’s top immigration lawyers and current Kansas Secretary of State, Alabama now has the strongest law deterring illegal immigration in the country.

The legislature passed pro-life legislation including a ban on abortion after 20 weeks when the unborn child can feel pain (HB18).  Unfortunately, several pro-life bills got caught up in the filibuster process and failed to pass.  These include Personhood legislation that would define persons as all humans from the point of fertilization and the Health Care Rights of Conscience Act which gives health care providers, institutions and payers the right to decline to perform services that violate their consciences.  Also on the health care front, the legislature passed Representative Blaine Galliher’s HB60 which prohibits mandatory participation in any health care system, essentially opting us out of the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare.

The legislature also passed legislation that will improve campaign finance records and improve transparency.  Two great examples are Senator Arthur Orr’s SB136 which requires electronic filing of campaign contributions starting a year before the election monthly, and then requires weekly filings beginning a month before the election, and Representative Paul DeMarco’s Fiscal Transparency Act which requires the State Finance Department to produce monthly financial reports for the General Fund and the Education Trust Fund, and to publish them in a prominent place on the department’s website.  They also took measures to improve election security by passing Representative Kerry Rich’s amendment to the Alabama Constitution to require voters to provide a valid photo ID in order to vote.

Businesses both big and small will benefit from Representative April Weaver’s legislation to allow businesses to deduct 100% of the amount they pay in health insurance premiums on their state income tax and Representative Blaine Galliher’s bill to authorize an income tax credit for employers creating jobs.  The legislature also took steps to protect the right to a secret ballot in employee representation by passing Representative Kurt Wallace’s HB64.

Another good budget measure passed was Representative Jack Williams’ HB13 which will allow for the use of life cycle budgeting in competitive bids and public works projects.

There were a few pieces of controversial legislation that sparked heated debate this session.  One such bill would have reauthorized the Forever Wild Land Trust program.  Eventually a compromise was reached, and the legislature passed Senator Dick Brewbaker’s constitutional amendment to reauthorize the Forever Wild program allowing the people of Alabama to vote on the issue in 2012.

Representative Jack Williams’ bill to grant the Jefferson County Commission limited home rule to levy additional taxes prompted fierce debate on both sides.  After passing the House Jefferson County Delegation by a vote of 9 – 8, the bill died in the Alabama Senate after a contest filed by Senator Scott Beason.

Another controversial bill would have enforced a sales and/or “use” tax on goods ordered on the internet from out of state.  Eagle Forum fought hard against this legislation and we are very pleased to say it did not pass.  To learn more about this bill, go to alabamaeagle.org.  Eagle Forum also worked against Representative John Merrill’s HB6 which would have lowered the mandatory school age from 7 to 6 years of age.  This bill was stopped in the Alabama Senate.

There were a few pieces of good legislation that didn’t pass.  We would have liked to have seen passed Representative Paul DeMarco’s Taxpayer Bill of Rights (HB427) and Senator Cam Ward’s Foreign Law Prohibition Bill (SB61), along with Senator Dick Brewbaker’s resolution encouraging the State Board of Education to retain complete control over Alabama’s academic standards (SJR153), but time ran out.  While Senator Paul Bussman’s shared parenting legislation (SB196) did not pass, a constructive dialogue began and we hope he will come back next year with a stronger bill.

Overall, we think the members of the Alabama Legislature, Speaker Hubbard and Pro Tem Marsh deserve a solid A for this successful session, and we hope they will continue to be committed to passing the kind of serious reforms they addressed this year.

Eagle Forum Congratulates Legislators on Passage of Students First Act

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

05/26/11

Contact:  Brooklyn Roberts

Eagle Forum Congratulates Legislators On Passage Of Students First Act

(Birmingham)  This week, despite AEA union bosses’ efforts to stop meaningful reform, SB310 also known as the Students First Act passed the Alabama House.

“The real winners tonight were Alabama’s students and parents who will benefit from schools’ ability to fire teachers that are underperforming,” said Eunie Smith, President of Eagle Forum of Alabama.

Under the Students First Act, teachers will continue to receive tenure after completing three years of full time employment.  However, SB310 provides for the dismissal of tenured teachers who clearly fail to provide adequate education and care for their students.  Teachers will still have recourse to appeal the termination.

Despite the amount of misinformation surrounding SB310, supporters stood strong and passed this badly needed reform.  “Eagle Forum has long been an advocate of sound education reform in Alabama, and we are extremely proud of our conservative legislators who stayed true to their principles to improve Alabama’s education system, even in the face of strong opposition, said Smith.  “They were extremely courageous and should be commended for their efforts.  It was a victory for all Alabama’s children.”

For more information contact Executive Director, Brooklyn Roberts at 205-441-9879

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Improve Education In Alabama Through Teacher Tenure Reform

Last week, the Alabama Senate passed out of committee a bill that will reform the state’s tenure law.  Senator Trip Pittman’s SB310 will improve the dismissal process for teachers and state employees by removing the arbitration process and providing a fair hearing before an administrative law judge.  Current tenure laws have made it too difficult for school boards and principals to deal with bad teachers.  This law will allow locally elected school boards to decide what’s best for our schools rather than federal arbitrators who don’t care about Alabama.  Our tenure laws should protect teachers who put students first, not reward complacency and carelessness.

SB310 does NOT take away teacher tenure, it simply changes the dismissal process to make it easier to fire substandard teachers.  Good teachers will never have anything to worry about.

Please call your legislators and ask them to support SB310 and improve education in Alabama!

Legislative Week In Review

Things are moving right along in Montgomery.  Last Tuesday, the Alabama House passed the Education Budget (HB123)–that’s the earliest a budget’s been passed in a very long time.  The Senate passed bills:

  • prohibiting gassing as a method of euthanasia for cats and dogs (SB172),
  • allowing for election expense reimbursement from the state (SB139),
  • creating a crime of threatening harm or violence against a judicial system officer or employee (SB146), and
  • creating the crime of filing a false lien against a public officer or employee (SB197),

Wednesday was a busy day in committee.  Several good pieces of legislation passed out including:

  • HB25 Rep. Paul DeMarco’s Fiscal Transparency Act which will improve the state’s Open Alabama website by requiring the Finance Department to post monthly financial reports.
  • HB427 Rep. Paul DeMarco’s Taxpayer Bill of Rights which will enhance the protections taxpayers have against tax assessments handed down by the state.
  • SB196 Sen. Paul Bussman’s Alabama Children and Families Act which will change the presumption in child custody cases where two fit parents are involved to a 50/50 split.

Also on Wednesday, there was a very contentious public hearing on Sen. Trip Pittman’s proposed Teacher Tenure Reform (SB310).

Yesterday, the House passed the controversial Forever Wild reauthorization (HB126).  They also debated HB6 which is Rep. John Merrill’s bill to lower the mandatory school age from 7 to 6 years of age.  Due to some Republican dissent, Rep. Merrill carried his bill over and a vote wasn’t taken.  Eagle Forum is strongly opposed to this legislation because we believe parents should retain the right to decide if their 6-year-old son or daughter is ready for first grade.  The House also passed HB230 which creates income tax credits for employers who create jobs.

The Alabama Senate spent most of Thursday working on Sunset Laws.